Short Updates on CEA Chess Programs Friday, Oct 16 2009 

Hello everyone,

It has been a while since I have been able to write an update on any of our current projects or plans.

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Bontang, East Kalimantan (Borneo) Indonesia

1) Currently I am in the midst of setting up the Chess club here at SMA YPK, a highschool in East Kalimantan, or Borneo.  There is a lot of excitement and my students (I’m also working as an English teacher here) have asked me when it will start.  Yesterday I had several students over my house to play chess.  I also taught a few the basics of XiangQi, or Chinese chess.  I plan to add XiangQi to the formal chess club later.

Kakemer, Western Kenya

2) The Kakemer Resource Center has officially opened.  Along with the largest library in Kakemer and a very successful computer training program (the first of its kind in the area), the CEA chess program that was started at the KR Center for primary and secondary students in the surrounding villages has been more than successful.  Many students are coming almost every day after their classes in the neighboring secondary school and are bringing their friends as well.  New boards for the resource center should be arriving with the help of the Global Literacy Project within the next few months, allowing more and more students to play.  There are picture of students from the KR Center playing below.

Malaba, Western Kenya

3) Students at the Isegeretoto Primary School in Malaba, Kenya are keeping the excitement of their first tournament alive.  From reports of Collette Young who works with the school, the chess club is as active as it was before CEA volunteers left it to be run by the school itself.  Beautiful new plaques have now replaced the temporary tournament trophies that are in pictures in previous posts on this blog.  Hopefully I will be able to post more pictures soon.

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Thank you,

Paul Chiariello

Chess Tournament Pics at Isegeretoto Primary, Kenya Wednesday, Sep 23 2009 

While at the Isegeretoto Primary school in Malaba, Western Kenya the CEA held its second chess tournament.  This was also the first program with primary school children.  Along with the help of Ashley Salerno, who picked up running the tournament after I left and took these pictures, the two day competition went smoothly and we were able to award first second and third places to several students.

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Students thinking hard during the chess tournament

Students thinking hard during the chess tournament

Nearly 35 students, boys and girls, signed up for the double elimination tournament.  To finish within a reasonable time we had to borrow several chess boards from the Kakemer Resource Center, another CEA program we were running in the area.  With seven boards total we were able to finish in two days.

Final match at the Isegeretoto's first chess tourn

Final match at the Isegeretoto's first chess tourn

Above, a few students face off in the heated finals mat

First, Second, Third and Fourth place at the chess tourn

First, Second, Third and Fourth place at the chess tourn

First, Second and Third place all got trophies while fourth also got an honorable mention in the following Monday’s student assembly.  In front of the entire primary school the four students got their rightful recognition for all of their hard work and clever playing.  The tournament was definitely a success and created a lot of interest.  Both students and faculty were very excited for next semester’s tournament, which they will be administering.

Thank you,

Paul Chiariello

A Few More Pics from Uganda and Kenya Wednesday, Sep 9 2009 

Me teaching the basics at Isegeretoto Primary

Me teaching the basics at Isegeretoto Primary

At the Isegeretoto Primary School in Malaba, Kenya I was able for the first time to work with primary, or elementary, school children.  It was also the first time where i had to work with 30-40+ students at once.  The board I’m working with was very helpful.  I was able to draw simple illustrations of each of the pieces and how they moved.  In the center you can also see the “Rules of Checkmate.”  These are five simple rules that slowly evolved to help explain wht check means, the need to escape, how to escape, and what happens if you can’t, i.e. checkmate.  FYI: pawns are very difficult to explain!

Bird's Eye View: Collaborative Play

Bird's Eye View: Collaborative Play

The large number of kids also worked to my advantage in some ways as they would play in teams.  Their separate chunks of knowledge concerning the rules balanced out so that they made, as a whole, fewer mistakes.  They were also able to refer to the board in arguments about the rules, bishops and rooks were often confused.

Copying the basic rules of Checkmate and Movement

Copying the basic rules of Checkmate and Movement

Eventually I came up with a more precise set of rules for checkmate that the students could understand without any other background knowledge of chess.  For example using the word “eat” and other synonyms instead of “capture.”  Above is a secondary, or high school, student at the Kakemer Resource Center in Western Kenya copying his own set of the rules for the movements of the pieces and the rules of checkmate from another student as he watches some of his friends play.

Pointing out good moves and other pointers at the Restore Academy

Pointing out good moves and other pointers at the Restore Academy

The Restore Academy was the CEA’s first  pilot program.  Northern Uganda, especially Gulu, was ravaged for 20 years by a civil war which only subsided (but not ended) two years ago.  Many of these students didnt have a chance to go to school for long periods of time throughout their lives and had never even heard of chess before.  However, they picked it up quickly and with a passion.  Here I’m pointing out to day old players how to think ahead a few moves and watch out for some obvious attacks.

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hopefully i’ll publish more photos and media from the CEA’s programs in Uganda and Kenya before we start our new initiatives in Indonesia!

Thanks for reading,

Paul Chiariello

A Few Pics from our Programs in Uganda and Kenya Sunday, Sep 6 2009 

Last summer we set up three pilot programs in Gulu, Northern Uganda in an area recently torn apart by a 20 year civil war  and Malaba and Kakemer, Western Kenya which is the lowest scoring educational disctrict in the country.  Currently we are setting up more programs in Borneo, Indonesia and elsewhere on the archipeligo.

Playing a few games at the Restore Academy in Gulu, Uganda

Playing a few games at the Restore Academy in Gulu, Uganda

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To the left – you can see myself (the only mzungu in the picture) and a bunch of the other kids at the Restore Academy.   This was our first pilot program.  For details about all three of these programs you can check out my personal blog: paulchiari.wordpress.com.

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Teacher and students getting into the game at Isegeretoto Primary in Kenya

Teacher and students getting into the game at Isegeretoto Primary in Kenya

To the left – the kids at Isegeretoto Primary school in Malaba, western kenya learned a lot quicker than their teachers.  It was a beautiful thing to see the pasison and interest that these little kids had for the game.  With very few other intellectually stimulating activities outside of the rote learning of the classroom, these kids couldn’t get enough.
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Two high school girls playing at the Kakemer Resource Center in Kenya

Two high school girls playing at the Kakemer Resource Center in Kenya

At the Kakemer Resource Center in rural           western Kenya I was finally able to get the girls as interested in     Chess as the guys.  With the first two programs there seemed to be the notion that chess was a guys game and a lot of the girls stepped aside (though in both places there were a few female stars).  However, at the KRC the girls were just as aggressive and interested.  A lot were even better than most of the guys.  It was a beautiful thing.

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Thanks,

Paul Chiariello

What Chess for Education Abroad, Inc. is All About Tuesday, Aug 11 2009 

Hello everyone, some people reading this may have read part of the other, general blog where i wrote while in Uganda and Kenya this past summer where discussed the CEA and the projects I was working on there.  Now that the CEA has taken off so well i decided to devote a blog to follow its progress and programs.

The idea for Chess for Education Abroad, Inc.  (CEA) came after realizing how well a few little ideas fit together that could continue to build on the success of the chess club I started at the Restore Academy in Gulu, Northern Uganda.

The basic idea for the CEA is that we make connections between chess clubs and other organizations in the US and develop and nuture chess clubs abroad in rural and disadvantaged schools in developing economies.

US chess clubs will partner with overseas schools to provide chess supplies, hirer tutors and give small scholarships for tournaments. Each of these are relatively small sums. Chess supplies will cost less than $30 (though more with books) and maybe that again to ship them overseas (for now we have volunteer contacts to bring supplies to most locations). In schools where we could not find volunteers, tutors would only cost 10-20 dollars a month.  Lastly, scholarships would not only help with student fees to (which for many children in the areas where we work are hard often to meet) but also encourage the clubs and tournaments.   Prizes would  be small by US standards but would cover 20/15/10% of tuition for 1st/2nd/3rd places, relatively.

We envision chess clubs holding tournaments with a portion of the entry fee going to the CEA clubs overseas.  Our goal is to help both the supporting US club members expanding their global perspective as well as develop quality chess clubs in areas where rote memorization and resourceless classes are what “education” means.  Currently interactive communication between clubs in the US and clubs overseas will be limited because of limited web access in these overseas rural areas.  We expect this to start to change soon as the internet access expands.

All of the CEA staff is made of volunteers who donate themselves to the organization and its programs.  We will be partnering with educational organizations abroad to continue to expand our contacts. Already, organizations like the Global Literacy Project and Invisible Children, though informally, have expressed a strong interest and work closely with several dozen schools in Uganda, Kenya and South Africa.

I have already set up the second and third pilot programs in Kakemer and Malaba in Western Kenya at the Kakemer Resource Center and the Isegeretoto Primary School. The 1st pilot program in Uganda was at a secondary school, while both of these programs involve only or a mix of primary students.  So far each of the programs have been beyond expectation successes.

I am also planning on setting up 3-5 more pilot programs in Indonesia on my Fulbright grant starting in August.  And I would like to introduce XianQi, or Chinese Chess, to one school while in Indonesia as well.

After the CEA is settled, i.e. all pilot programs are running well, we have a stable support base in the US from partnering clubs, all incorporation documents have been finalized and we have worked out a set curriculum, the non-profit will start setting up chess programs vicariously. Hopefully this goal will be achieved around a year from this post in 2010.

* *  If you would like to help and know of a possible chess club in the states that may be willing to hold such tournaments, please leave a comment with details. * **

Thank you for reading,

Paul Chiariello